Writer & Integral MAsTER Coach™

Down to the human.

Down to the human.

This week’s poem is by Toi Derricotte. Toi is an American poet born in Hamtramck, Michigan near Detroit. I chose this poem because it captures the vibrancy and racial complexity of the city. Reading the work of poets born in or local to Detroit reveals an entirely different lens through which to see the city; something that brings the other historical readings I’m doing on Detroit to life. It is above all else a deeply human place—both in its former glory and its post-bankruptcy resurgence.

So, what brings you back to your humanity?

Blackbottom

By Toi Derricotte


When relatives came from out of town,
we would drive down to Blackbottom,
drive slowly down the congested main streets
-- Beubian and Hastings --
trapped in the mesh of Saturday night.
Freshly escaped, black middle class,
we snickered, and were proud;
the louder the streets, the prouder.
We laughed at the bright clothes of a prostitute,
a man sitting on a curb with a bottle in his hand.
We smelled barbecue cooking in dented washtubs,
and our mouths watered.
As much as we wanted it we couldn’t take the chance.

Rhythm and blues came from the windows, the throaty voice of
a woman lost in the bass, in the drums, in the dirty down
and out, the grind.
“I love to see a funeral, then I know it ain’t mine.”
We rolled our windows down so that the waves rolled over us
like blood.
We hoped to pass invisibly, knowing on Monday we would
return safely to our jobs, the post office and classroom.
We wanted our sufferings to be offered up as tender meat,
and our triumphs to be belted out in raucous song.
We had lost our voice in the suburbs, in Conant Gardens,
where each brick house delineated a fence of silence;
we had lost the right to sing in the street and damn creation.

We returned to wash our hands of them,
to smell them
whose very existence
tore us down to the human.

Difficult money conversations.

Difficult money conversations.

Writing out agreements.

Writing out agreements.