Writer & Integral MAsTER Coach™

How you learn.

How you learn.

Pedagogy is about how we approach teaching; it’s about method and practice. When it comes to educating ourselves and each other about personal finance, information isn’t enough. We also need to think about how we’re delivering and receiving that information. If having a healthier relationship with money was simply about data, creatives, in all their resourcefulness, would be ahead of the curve.

So in response to this need for new ways of learning about money that meets creatives where they’re at, I’m creating my first online course. It will be a part of a suite of courses that help creatives like you access financial wellbeing. My objective is to make my coaching services more financially accessible and something you can work into your variable schedule with ease. Pedagogically, I’m letting the process of building these courses inform my teaching.

Writing the workbook forced me to think about what is truly essential learning for you to have. In our information-saturated world, more isn’t necessarily better. Just enough is better because you can actually retain what you’re taking in. Thus, the courses I create will support you with making sustainable, micro-changes in your relationship to money. What’s more, my teaching tools will be multimedia and offer ways for you to connect with other creatives doing this work.

Filming offered its own learnings. After a two days of unsuccessfully trying to shoot the first lesson, I realized that I needed something to make my teaching more fun and engaging. While money is a loaded topic, it doesn’t need to be presented as such. What’s more, video doesn’t need to be a one-way conversation. So, in order to better meet you in a creative and dynamic learning space, I needed to dip into my past as a textile artist.

I was first introduced to pedagogy when I was studying Theatre & Development at Concordia University. While I dropped out of that degree and completed a BFA in Material Art & Design at OCAD University instead, my textile-based thesis project was a post-apocalyptic children’s puppet show called Sophie & The Garbage Eaters. I was interested in using puppets to talk about dark topics because people will listen to puppets where they won’t always listen to people.

So I’ve decided to incorporate a puppet into my courses on personal finance for creatives. For one thing, it will make talking about economic justice and why money is never just about money more accessible. For another thing, co-teaching with a puppet will hopefully take the edge off the discomfort you feel working on your relationship with money. It’ll be the education we all needed from Sesame Street but weren’t ready for until now.

So, how do you learn and what supports that way of learning?

Say it out loud.

Say it out loud.

Write money.

Write money.