When to redo it.

When to redo it.

Last week, I made the decision to reshoot the videos for my online class How To Rewrite Your Money Story (Even If You’re Broke). After weeks of trying to clean up its wonky audio, I realized that it would be faster for me just to film it a second time. I spent an entire day entertaining this possibility before I committed to it. I needed to be sure that this wasn’t me hiding or an early sign of project sabotage.

It wasn’t. The original footage really was good enough but the puppet voiceovers didn’t match the original audio. Listening to the tracks made me cringe. If I’m going to ask people to trust me to help them get into a healthier relationship with money, I need to do so in a way that won’t make their ears bleed. So, as much as I’m longing to finish it, I’ve pushed the launch date of the project back so I can share something I’m proud of.

Like so many creatives, I am often my only reference point. While I do have folx in my life whom I ping off of often, at the end of the day, the choice to redo something is my decision to make. And it’s in times like these that I am infinitely grateful for the delayed gratification that I learned in art school. Because as much as I want to get my work in front of the people who matter, I also want them to care about what I’m offering.

In addition to my ability to lean into delayed gratification, I am also leaning into the financial wellbeing I have cultivated in my life and professional practice. At this point, I’ve burned through all my savings and my debt repayment has dropped to the bare minimum. Old me would have been freaking out. Money equals freedom in my life and I get very anxious when I feel like I’m financially vulnerable.

My new way of being with money, however, knows that tacking on another month of work and another few expenses isn’t going to break me in the large scheme of things. Instead of feeding the money stress and money fear I’m feeling, I’m sitting with it. I’m separating my emotions from what’s actually real when it comes to how I’m making and spending money right now. And as it turns out, things aren’t as dire as they feel.

The choice to redo something is a difficult one to make. It requires you to step back from your work to try and see it more objectively. And, if when you step back, you find that redoing it will make your project more generous and will better help the folx who your work is for, then redo it. Reshape the parts that don’t quite fit; the things that you’re not going to be proud of. Time is precious and you have time. 

So, what are you checking for to see if your work needs to be redone?


Identity work.

Identity work.

Who it's for.

Who it's for.