Write money.

Write money.

I write about money a lot in my Morning Pages. Sometimes I write about my relationship to it and sometimes I write out figures to help me make financial decisions. Doing this gives me hope, helps me work through possibilities, and allows me to see my emotional responses to money more objectively. In addition to that, writing about money gives me a shame-free space to acknowledge my money-related anxiety, mistakes, and learnings.

When I started writing about money, I was surprised by how deep a topic it is. While I knew that money is complex and often not just about money, I had no idea that I had so much work to do shifting my relationship to it. I also didn’t realize how important getting into a healthy relationship with money was. I thought that all I needed to do to unfuck myself financially was to get a budget together and actually stick to it.

As it turns out, the reason I was bad with money was not due to incompetence or a lack of financial education on my part. My writing revealed that my relationship to money was out of whack. So it only makes sense that I struggled to create the financial stability. As long as I was operating from my current way of being with money, financial wellbeing would always feel just out of reach.

Money is such a big part of our lives and yet we receive such limited information on how to work with it holistically. On top of that, money is also presented as sterile and linear, similar to the way that food can be reduced to nutritional value alone. In truth, our relationship to both food and money have emotional, cultural, social, physical, spiritual, interpersonal, and moral influences. So there’s nothing simple or finite about the way we relate to money.

Writing, then, offers us a way into exploring money in all its complexity. It allows us to weave in the different facets of ourselves so that we can more accurately captures our financial reality. Writing about money gives us space to get into conversation with it and with ourselves. It makes rewriting unhelpful narratives possible and also provides a space for us to imagine a more aligned financial future.

If you’re someone who is longing to have a different relationship with money, try writing out your current situation and how money shows up in your life. Put it all down on the page, especially your doubts, fears, and shame. Then write about what you’re hoping for financially. Include your money goals as well as musings on how you want to feel about money and work with it in your day-to-day life. Be audacious, optimistic, and specific.

Then keep writing about money. Maybe in your Morning Pages or maybe just one a week. Check in with your relationship to money, just like you would an intimate lover or friend. Show up conscious of how you’re feeling and be patient when you respond reactively. Healing your relationship with money is going to take time. Consistency will get you there so keep writing about money and trust that the clarity you’re seeking will reveal itself through that process.

What do you want your relationship to money to feel like?

How you learn.

How you learn.

All with love.

All with love.